THE VILLAGES ON ATLANTIC BEACH

VILLAGES NAMES – ATLANTIC BEACH GOLF ESTATE

The Villages at Atlantic Beach have all been named after ships which were lost to sea along the South African shoreline, more specifically the Cape waters. The group housing schemes were named after famous golf courses.

 NAMES IN USE:

 

NAUTILUS VILLAGE:                THE NAUTILUS

A British Brig of 163 tons, built in 1812, and commanded by Capt W. Tripe. Wrecked in Table Bay on 31 March 1826 while on a voyage from London to Maritius with a cargo of sundries. No lives were lost.

NORFOLK VILLAGE:                 THE NORFOLK

Wooden schooner of 132 tons, built in 1841 at Yarmouth, owned by J.O.Smith, Algoa Bay, and commanded by Capt P.H.Watts. Wrecked on Bird Island, on 23 September 1850 while waiting to load a cargo of guano for Maritius. No lives were lost

 BIRKENHEAD VILLAGE:          THE HMS BIRKENHEAD

British iron paddle-frigate of 1400 bm, built in 1845 by Laird, converted to a troopship in 1848, and commanded by Capt R. Salmond. Piled up on Birkenhead Rock off Danger Point on 26 February 1852 at night while on a voyage from Simon’s Town to East London with troops for the Frontier War. 445 lives were lost. The wreck has secured a place in history due to the gallantry of her men, who, in the face of grave danger, allowed the women and children to escape in the boats before attempting to save themselves – the “Birkenhead Drill”

STRATHBLANE VILLAGE:       THE SS STRATHBLANE

British screw steamer of 2341 tons, built in 1888 by Russell & Co, Port Glasgow, and commanded by Capt J . Nimmo. Beached a little east of Chelsea Point, West of Cape Recife, on 23 January 1890 after striking a rock while on a voyage from London to Natal with a general Cargo including sleepers and gold-mining equipment No lives were lost.

 OAKBURN VILLAGE:                 THE OAKBURN

British steel cargo steamer of 3865 tons, built in 1904 by Russell  &  Co, Port Glasgow, and commanded by Capt J.J. Crosthwaithe. Wrecked in the big bay east of Duiker Point on the Cape Peninsula on the 21 May 1906 in fog while on a voyage from New York to Sydney with a general cargo. Two Chinese seamen were drowned.

ROYAL SAXON VILLAGE:       THE ROYAL SAXON

A British wooden barque of 322 tons, built in 1847 at Leith , and commanded by Capt J, Millar. Wrecked at Paarden Island on 1 October 1851 at night while entering Table Bay after a voyage from London with a cargo of coal. No lives were lost.

WARATAH VILLAGE:              THE SS WALLARAH

Blue Anchor-Line  steamer of 3505 tons, built in 1891 by the Sunderland Shipbuilding Company, and commanded by Capt F.H Ekins. Wrecked on the north west tip of Dassen Island (Boom Point) at 04h45 on 1August 1891 in heavy fog while on her maiden voyage from London  to Melbourne with general cargo. No lives were lost.

 BRUNSWICK VILLAGE:             THE BRUNSWICK

English East-Indiaman of 1200 tons, commanded by Capt James Grant. Ran aground at Simon’s Town  on 19 September 1805 after losing three anchors during a south-east gale.

COLEBROOK VILLAGE :              THE COLEBROOKE

The Colebrooke was an English East Indiaman captained by Arthur Morris. It was during her third voyage, on her way to Bombay when she hit a reef known today as Anvil Rock and sank in Kogel Bay near Cape Town on August 24, 1778. Seven people drowned and none of the trading cargo was saved. The wreck was discovered in 1984 and salvaged in the 1980s and 1990s.

Group housing areas (originally sold by Atlantic Beach Property Sales off-plan): Pebble Beach (free-standing homes), Turnberry (compact free-standing and semi-detached townhouses), St Andrews (free-standing homes), Glen Eagles (semi-detached units) and Royal Troon (apartments)